Category Archives: Anarchy

Eight Stateless Questions Answered

Here is the first program using the new production facilities. I answer some classic questions about stateless societies.

Libertarians / Voluntaryists / Anarchists facebook group
https://www.facebook.com/groups/112595305444742/

Some more programs dealing with these topics:

The Concept of Law
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_R5_EefMhQ

Empire Law
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1M6qEhBqXk8

Stateless Societies
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GK-AGK4FEO0

Without Government
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULqCJGCwkAA

Sources – see programs above.

The new freedomphilosophy.tv channel web site!
http://freedomphilosophy.tv/

Without Government

November the 10th was Remembrance Sunday a photo opportunity for nationalist and state flunkies to show their pseudo emotions and faux morality.

Hobbes though that without a strong central authority, civil society would fragment and people descend into a primitive and brutal life. There’s even a kind of meme that you can google that goes something like this “without government … people would run around killing each other”.

As a remedy to all this soldier and state glorifying pomp, let’s unwind that double-think with a little bit of reality check. Because it seems to me that government people have a long history of running around killing each other and a lot of people who were just minding their own business.

The fallacy here is that a civil society with law is impossible without a state and a central authority. I’ve covered this falsehood in many previous programs.

Stateless Societies

In this program I define the state and contrast stateless and statist societies. The critical difference is that stateless societies do not have the corporate institution of government.

There are various examples of stateless societies such as medieval Ireland, modern day Somalia* and more ancient cultures such as the aboriginal peoples of the USA.

*Somalia’s so called government is being funded by Norway

Some of my previous programs deal with these topics separately:

“Anarchy? What Happens?” talks about common law traditions
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2Ne_c6Oe-g

“Breaking The Corporate Matrix” links together various threads of the state
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9-iGDXnOJk

“Turings Apology” touches on some consequences of the lack objectivity in law
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hGj5749Ks64

“The Concept of Law” examines what we mean by law
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_R5_EefMhQ

See also:

Mike Shanklin, “In Your Anarchist Society, Who Will Make The Laws?”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7uUPDrcamE

Ancient Ireland’s success with the free market and a stateless society
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=su9OqvBbSD0

A page about The Brehon Laws
http://www.alia.ie/tirnanog/sochis/iv.html

A Smaller Social History of Ancient Ireland
http://ia600406.us.archive.org/12/items/smallersocialhis00joycuoft/smallersocialhis00joycuoft.pdf

Anarchy? What Happens?

In this program explore the false claim that a society without a power elites legal system is without law.

I show that a society that accepts the power elites legal system is a lawless society where extortion, theft and murder are permitted when the privileged classes engage in them.

I also contrast effective private systems of law to the state monopoly of law.

more about Brehon law:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=su9OqvBbSD0
http://www.courts.ie/Courts.ie/library3.nsf/pagecurrent/3CBAE4FE856E917B80256DF800494ED9

more about Xeer law:
http://mises.org/daily/2701

Mike Shanklin, “In Your Anarchist Society, Who Will Make The Laws?”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7uUPDrcamE

A Smaller Social History of Ancient Ireland
http://ia600406.us.archive.org/12/items/smallersocialhis00joycuoft/smallersocialhis00joycuoft.pdf
This book describes the civic society of ancient Ireland. Kings and other nobles helped to administer but did not make law, rather they were subject to law. “Irish kings were not despotic : they were all, from the supreme monarch down to the king of the tuath, in every sense, limited monarchs ; they were subject to law like their own free subjects.” p.25